How Nations Succeed: the launch of our 21st Century International Development programme

How Nations Succeed: the launch of our 21st Century International Development programme

Led by Molly Kiniry and Stephen Brien, the International Development programme seeks to establish which countries have created their own pathways from poverty to prosperity, and what lessons this may offer those nations who remain trapped.

An event hosted by the 21st Century International Development programme.

Published 5 Nov 2018

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Led by Molly Kiniry and Stephen Brien, the International Development programme seeks to establish which countries have created their own pathways from poverty to prosperity, and what lessons this may offer those nations who remain trapped.

Nearly all prosperous nations started on their development pathways many centuries ago, and were well-established by the early to mid-twentieth century. Those nations have been engaged in the distribution of aid monies to poorer nations for the better part of 60 years, but without a clear vision of how that money could be used to replicate the model for prosperity that they created for themselves.

  • Ascendant countries are so-called because they were poor in 1960 and now sit in the top 70 of the Legatum Prosperity Index and have grown their GDP per capita to over $10,000.
  • Stalled countries now sit between 70-100 in the Legatum Prosperity Index, and have failed to increase their GDP per capita to over $10,000.
  • Trapped countries sit between 100-130 in the Prosperity Index and have a GDP per capita of less than $3,000.

The focus of our launch event was on the first category of Ascendant countries, which have managed, for the most part, to pull themselves out of poverty, and maintained the belief throughout this process that ‘ourselves’ (a national identity which matched their legal borders) existed;

  • These countries developed across multiple fronts concurrently, strengthening their institutions, growing their economies, and improving the wellbeing of their people;
  • Across all fronts, these countries attracted the people, ideas, and capital they needed to succeed—and managed those contributions on their own terms;
  • These countries did not enjoy unalloyed growth in prosperity, but when crises occurred, they responded proactively and managed them well.

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